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Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:109:\"Declaration of views_handler_argument::init() should be compatible with views_handler::init(&$view, $options)\";s:5:\"%file\";s:86:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_argument.inc\";s:5:\"%line\";i:744;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:134:\"Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_validate() should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state)\";s:5:\"%file\";s:84:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc\";s:5:\"%line\";i:607;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:130:\"Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_submit() should be compatible with views_handler::options_submit($form, &$form_state)\";s:5:\"%file\";s:84:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc\";s:5:\"%line\";i:607;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:148:\"Declaration of views_handler_filter_node_status::operator_form() should be compatible with views_handler_filter::operator_form(&$form, &$form_state)\";s:5:\"%file\";s:100:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/modules/node/views_handler_filter_node_status.inc\";s:5:\"%line\";i:13;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134

Warning: Table './transiti_db/watchdog' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: INSERT INTO watchdog (uid, type, message, variables, severity, link, location, referer, hostname, timestamp) VALUES (0, 'php', '%message in %file on line %line.', 'a:4:{s:6:\"%error\";s:14:\"strict warning\";s:8:\"%message\";s:62:\"Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically\";s:5:\"%file\";s:63:\"/home/transiti/public_html/sites/all/modules/views/views.module\";s:5:\"%line\";i:906;}', 3, '', 'http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1461', '', '54.211.113.223', 1418941123) in /home/transiti/public_html/includes/database.mysqli.inc on line 134
Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) Analysis | Transition Towns New Zealand Aotearoa

Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) Analysis

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Richard Lee
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Joined: 8 Sep 2008
Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) Analysis

I think a big part of Transition is planning for the future we would like to see. It was suggested on the google group that rather than just focussing on the doom, we should be using that information to develop positive strategies. It was also suggested that a Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat Analysis is a good place to start to try and help map ourselves out of the poo that is about to/already hitting the fan.

                 This I think is a very good idea, so I haveput my thoughts down in the SWOT framework of how I think NZ in general fares (see below)_. This is a work in progress and I would like others to add to this analysis and give comment.

              I think that it would also be a very good idea if each TT group undertook similar analysis of their local region to determine what it is that we are up against and how we can develop strategies to overcome the threats and weaknesses we face.

Strengths

 

·         Low population (not that many mouths to feed)

·         We grow a lot of food. NZ exports more food than we import.

·         Abundant fresh water

·         Geographically isolated

·         Decent soil

·         Stable democratic political system

·         Minor but good quality reserves of oil and natural gas

·         Good cool temperate to warm temperate climate

·         Approximately 60% of electricity generated from renewable

The much-touted No 8 fencing wire mentality - using ingenuity to innovate with limited resources. This attitude got a good workout during the protectionism of the 80s, which really wasn't that long ago - so we should be able to resurrect it.

- experience with alternative currency systems (even national)

- fair number of social organisations (as far as I can judge from Kerikeri), showing the will for social engagement

- open minded people (as compared to my home country Belgium), willing to discuss and contemplate alternatives to the 'quest for growth'

- Maori population (especially the older people), who still have a living memory of strong local communities based around a share economy and small scale organical agriculture

  • High literacy rate
  • Socially progressive culture
  • Nowhere in New Zealand is too far from the sea, which tends to buffer temperature extremes.

    New Zealand is a very good place for growing things. At present, much of what we grow is on the basis of potential export receipts (cows, pines), but there is a lot of potential to grow other things.

  • Weakness

    ·         Highly geographically dispersed population in both rural and suburban areas limiting the feasibility of public transport.

    ·         Geographically isolated meaning at the end of the global supply chain.

    ·         Very little manufacturing exists

    ·         We import significant amounts of staple foods such as grains and pulses.

    ·         Traditional grain growing areas are being converted to dairy

    ·         We rely on significant amounts of imported synthetic fertilizers

    ·         High rate of car ownership

    • Foreign ownership of banks and most industry
    • Tiny economy - super vulnerable to sudden changes
    • Highly urbanised
    • - no long culture of local community life, most towns are spread out and lack a true centre

      Health and medical supplies almost entirely imported - including contraceptives (it's a subset of the more general point about the lack of local manufacturing)

      Domestic transport 99% dependent on fossil fuels

      Pervasive culture of the private car

      Governance arrangements at every level (local, regional, national) which favour cars and roads over other modes of transport

      Poor urban, and very poor rural and inter-city, rail links and services

      Electricity generation and transmission system not well organised to get renewably-generated power to domestic consumers: for example, 15% of New Zealand's electricity is used by the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter, but, if this were to close, transmission constraints make it difficult to send this electricity to where most domestic consumption occurs

      Political power of resource-extraction industries, e.g. Solid Energy (coal SOE)

      Almost complete dominance of neo-classical ("liberal") economic views in Universities, the media, Government departments etc.: both in terms of the dominance of these views within institutions dealing with economics, and the dominance of economics over other disciplines

    •  

    Opportunities

    ·         Dependence on pastoral agriculture means there is a “clear slate” with which we can redesign agriculture to incorporate appropriate water management  and polycultutral farming strategies. i.e re-localisation of food production.  Thus reducing impact on natural systems through agriculture rather than increasing impacts

    ·         Abundant opportunity through medium to micro hydro, wind and tidal systems to decentralize the electricity grid and further increase renewable generation. 

    ·         Spread out nature of suburban sprawl leaves opportunity to incorporate local food production into medium density population areas through the use of current wasteland, road verges, parks and backyards.

    ·         Significant opportunities to close the loops on numerous waste streams such as nutrient and energy capture from sewage, putrescible waste, farming run-off and forestry.

    - national currency with small population makes swap to alternative monetary system (i.e. interest free) easier, especially if current currency would become unstable (due to massive foreign devestment)

    Many potential renewable energy resources are being barely utilised at present - for example, New Zealand has better solar energy potential than Germany, yet use of solar energy (both passive and active) in New Zealand is minuscule, because current policies, housing regulations etc. in New Zealand do not encourage the use of solar energy.

    "Tightly coupled" political system which means that the chains of influence are relatively small - this cuts both ways, as it makes it easier for both ordinary citizens and for big business to influence political processes.

     

    Threats

    ·         Existing lineal/industrial paradigm

    ·         Liquid energy shortfalls impacting on transport.

    ·         Continued contamination of soil and waterways

    • Quick fix band aid solution
    • Foreigners withdrawing all their investments ala Iceland
    • - 'law and order' and overregulation response from government on growing crisis, thereby restricting local initiatives to build on alternatives

      Most of population lives close to coast, and often not far above sea level - so, many cities and towns vulnerable to rapid sea level rise

      Likely short-to-medium effects of climate change on New Zealand include more droughts in east of both islands, more heavy rain & flooding in the west - both threaten food production

      Likely influx of climate refugees, firstly from Pacific Islands and Australia - this is a threat only if it overwhelms our systems' capacity to absorb additional people

    •  

    Rimu
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    some stuff to add

    Strengths:

    High literacy rate

    Socially progressive culture

     

    Weaknesses:

    Foreign ownership of banks and most industry

    Tiny economy - super vulnerable to sudden changes

    Highly urbanised

     

    Threats:

    Foreigners withdrawing all their investments ala Iceland

    Johanna Knox
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    Another strength

    The much-touted No 8 fencing wire mentality - using ingenuity to innovate with limited resources. This attitude got a good workout during the protectionism of the 80s, which really wasn't that long ago - so we should be able to resurrect it.

    geertdierick
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    More SWOT

    Strengths:

    - experience with alternative currency systems (even national)

    - fair number of social organisations (as far as I can judge from Kerikeri), showing the will for social engagement

    - open minded people (as compared to my home country Belgium), willing to discuss and contemplate alternatives to the 'quest for growth'

    - Maori population (especially the older people), who still have a living memory of strong local communities based around a share economy and small scale organical agriculture

    Weaknesses:

    - no long culture of local community life, most towns are spread out and lack a true centre

    Opportunities:

    - national currency with small population makes swap to alternative monetary system (i.e. interest free) easier, especially if current currency would become unstable (due to massive foreign devestment)

    Threaths:

    - 'law and order' and overregulation response from government on growing crisis, thereby restricting local initiatives to build on alternatives

     

    senjmito
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    A few more SWOT points

    Dear All,

    A valuable discussion!

    Here's my some additional suggested strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.

    Regards
    Tim

    Strengths

    Nowhere in New Zealand is too far from the sea, which tends to buffer temperature extremes.

    New Zealand is a very good place for growing things. At present, much of what we grow is on the basis of potential export receipts (cows, pines), but there is a lot of potential to grow other things.

    Weaknesses

    Health and medical supplies almost entirely imported - including contraceptives (it's a subset of the more general point about the lack of local manufacturing)

    Domestic transport 99% dependent on fossil fuels

    Pervasive culture of the private car

    Governance arrangements at every level (local, regional, national) which favour cars and roads over other modes of transport

    Poor urban, and very poor rural and inter-city, rail links and services

    Electricity generation and transmission system not well organised to get renewably-generated power to domestic consumers: for example, 15% of New Zealand's electricity is used by the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter, but, if this were to close, transmission constraints make it difficult to send this electricity to where most domestic consumption occurs

    Political power of resource-extraction industries, e.g. Solid Energy (coal SOE)

    Almost complete dominance of neo-classical ("liberal") economic views in Universities, the media, Government departments etc.: both in terms of the dominance of these views within institutions dealing with economics, and the dominance of economics over other disciplines

    Opportunities

    Many potential renewable energy resources are being barely utilised at present - for example, New Zealand has better solar energy potential than Germany, yet use of solar energy (both passive and active) in New Zealand is minuscule, because current policies, housing regulations etc. in New Zealand do not encourage the use of solar energy.

    "Tightly coupled" political system which means that the chains of influence are relatively small - this cuts both ways, as it makes it easier for both ordinary citizens and for big business to influence political processes.

    Threats

    Most of population lives close to coast, and often not far above sea level - so, many cities and towns vulnerable to rapid sea level rise

    Likely short-to-medium effects of climate change on New Zealand include more droughts in east of both islands, more heavy rain & flooding in the west - both threaten food production

    Likely influx of climate refugees, firstly from Pacific Islands and Australia - this is a threat only if it overwhelms our systems' capacity to absorb additional people

    Johanna Knox
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    Climate change/NZ's position near the pole

    In the SWOT analysis - NZ's position near the pole seems almost to fit into every category. I really think this is the wild card in NZ's deck.  NZ looks set to fare a lot better than many other regions in the coming decades of climate change ... but who knows what this will mean for us?

    It seems very unpredictable what form(s) the  'influx of climate refugees' that Tim mentions will take.

    You might've already seen this article from New Scientist:

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20126971.700-how-to-survive-the-co...

    And this map:

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_8ndgSYbdkZ0/SaoNHp_R0SI/AAAAAAAACmc/uiRqhGUd6u...

    Richard Lee
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    Not sure about that map

    Not sure about that map Johanna. 

     I don't know about the rest of the world but what they have suggested for Australia doesn't make any sense to me.   The existing habitable part of Aus particularly the tropical rainforests of Queensland suddenly becomes a desert but the already existing desert that is central western Australia suddenly greens up for reaforestation even though there is very little soil left in that area.

     And why on earth would the north of Aus be suddenly habitated when  Indonesia is wiped of the map. The Gulf of Carpentaria is essentially part of the same wether system as the indonesian archepeligo, so theortically if Indonesia becomes uninhabitable so would the Gulf....  which currently is already uninhabitable due to the poor soils and existing extreme weather patterns.

    And as for the central deserts of Aus becoming "solar" regions. Who are they going to power?

    Jared Diamond author of Collapse has said that New Zealand and the highlands of New Guinea are the best places on earth to cope with climate change. Yet that map has the New Guinea highlands as uninhabitable.

    It could be right in predicting that NZ becomes densley populated but I'm a bit dubious about that one. I don't deny that a lot of people will want to come here but if we see such collapse scenarios arising it a very long and treacherous sea voyage that requires either a lot of diesel fuel or a lot of sailing boats.

    I think we will get refugees, just not enmasse.

    As an aside to all that its probably worth saying that i went to the Brunell lecture the other week at Auckland Uni called "Entering the Ecological Age". Basically this high level Coporate sponsored jetsetting international engineer gave a lecture on "In the face of Climate change and resource depletion could the earth sustain 9.5 billion people by 2050?"

    Yeah right I hear eveyone say. Based on their "very sophisticated" computer modelling he argued earth could......and the picture he painted was the very same picture that Bill Mollison and other permaculturists have been painting for the last 30 odd years.

    Relocalise suburbs and cities with public transport, make walking and cycling preferable, close waste loops, renewable power, even local food production etc etc.

    ...it would seem even the "mainstream" is starting to get on board. Even the "suits" are talking about it

     

    Cheers

    Richard

    Johanna Knox
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    dodgy map/NZ's future

    Hi Richard - yes a dodgy map I'm sure!  (And those shaded red underwater bits looked a bt random to me ... and NZ is an 'island state' ... or maybe that was deliberate. lol.) It's someone's fantasy plan for how they'd like to think things could work.

    Still, the point I was obliquely hoping to make was that NZ is getting increasing amounts of press as being a good place to be during climate change, and I wonder how many people (as individuals or groups) will take this to heart, and who, and when?

    david broatch
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    map

    The article is not up to usual NS standards.

    At 4 degrees increase a lot of Antarctica will have  become black rock.

    Most likely  the tectonic/warming increases the seismic and volcanic activity and  brings  cooling  by ash ...as a result of load transfer to the Oceanic Plates. we could possibly see a sort of gaia balance achieved at ...say  14 metre sea level rise.

    move to NZ and zoom in at..

    http://www.climatechangewales.org.uk/public/college/key_stage_4/flood_maps/

    14 metres is as high as that model goes!

    A lot of Auckland goes under.

    The ring of fire will not be the best place to be, especially on the active field (Auckland)

    USGS  calculates an 84 metre rise if all of Antartica melts...

     

    Johanna Knox
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    Great map to play around with

    Thanks for that link David!

    Yeah, would be interesting to see one that went higher ...

    senjmito
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    What should we do next with the SWOT analysis?

    Interesting stuff with the maps - level of sea level rise is obviously a threat! - but I'm wondering: now that the SWOT analysis has been started, what's the best way of continuing with, or using, this work so it doesn't get lost? How could the Transition Towns movement best make use of it?

    What do people think?

    Regards
    Tim

    Richard Lee
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    Good Question

    I'm open to discussion on this one.

    My initial thoughts were that once we had a good SWOT list down we could then pick it a part in realtion to issues such as Food, Energy, Transport, Social, Currency etc and try and nut out pssible strategies under each which could then be integrated into a "big picture" energy descent plan.

    How we do that over the internet though is the question

     

    Cheers

    Richard

    hjones
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    No 8 wire - alternative options

    Especially for those who like to create machines out of next to nothing and will serve a purpose.

    this was passed to me and may provide options for powering equipment

    http://www.technologyforthepoor.com/PedalPowerReport/PedalPowerReport.htm

    STANDARD BICYCLE WITH PEDAL POWER ATTACHMENT

    (DUAL-PURPOSE BICYCLE)

    This manual describes the design and construction of a device which, when attached to a standard bicycle, will permit it to be used as a pedal‑power machine. The resulting machine, known as a dual-purpose bicycle, can be used to power numerous small‑scale mechanical devices such as grain threshers, grinders, water pumps, electrical generators, and a variety of small machine tools. When desired, the dual-purpose bicycle can be converted from its transportation mode to its pedal‑power mode, or vice versa within a matter of minutes.

    It should be noted that the design criteria, materials used, and the procedures adopted in construction may be modified to suit local situations. It is suggested that low-cost and readily available materials and standard bicycle parts be substituted whenever possible. Changes in construction method and in dimensions should be made according to the availability of materials and manufacturing capability.

    Johanna Knox
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    pedal power

    This is great Tim! Would love to know who in NZ is doing anything like this at the moment ...

    senjmito
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    pedal power + other appropriate technologies

    Maybe something TT people could build is a directory of people, companies and groups which are developing or using these kind of technologies and methods. Does anyone know whether such a directory already exists?

    rbateman
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    Hi, that's a good idea -

    Hi, that's a good idea - there is alot of 'stuff' out there and that is readily available but finding it can be very hard. I'm up for doing this, I've been doing it off an on in a variety of ways...anyone else interested?

    Johanna Knox
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    Pedal power

    Ha - just occurred to me that pedal powered machinery is in use all around NZ already, and has been for a very long time, in the form of spinning wheels. :)

    rbateman
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    Hi H Jones, thanks for

    Hi H Jones,

    thanks for posting this, its really inspirational. If you like this you might like to see Project H their H is for Hippo project is equally as inspirational as the dual purpose bike you shared with us.

    I'm not a fan of the use of the No8 phrase, I think NZ needs to move on from this, maybe we should call it No10 (No9 must be over by now). Design like the dual purpose bike refers me to Victor Papanek's book 'Design for the Real world' Maybe such useful and meaningful design should be called 'real world design'

    Thanks again for the link to the pedal power paper.

    senjmito
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    At the recent "Pathways to

    At the recent "Pathways to Resilient Communities" event in Wellington, there were a number of afternoon breakout sessions. I facilitated one on "Key Vulnerabilities" - basically, the "weaknesses" section of a SWOT analysis. I thought it was worth posting the results here, although there is some overlap with the above. From memroy, 7 people took part in the discussion.

    New Zealand's Key Vulnerabilities - workshop notes 1) We're a food producer, but we import most of our grain. There's likely to be an increasing shortage of grain plus higher grain prices. It would take 2-3 years to convert dairy farms to growing grain. Seeds are also imported - we need to stock seeds in NZ. There are also issues with international seed companies' ownership of seed stocks. There are efforts within NZ to counteract this, e.g. the Wairarapa Growing Company which has a heritage seeds programme, but these are small-scale. A bigger seed-savers' network is needed, and Government involvement/support could also help. 2) Fertiliser - we import it - it is going to get scarcer and more expensive, leading to a drop in our agricultural production. We need to convert to using organic fertilisers - how long would this take? 3) Structural vulnerability - to what extent do we have the capacity to be economically sovereign and choose our own path towards resilience, such as redirecting food production activity towards what we actually need? Development and adoption of local currencies is key here. 4) Despite the current slump in oil prices, oil will be in short supply in a few years, and prices will rise again. Currently, due to the Tui field, NZ is producing about 70% of the oil it imports, but almost all NZ-produced oil is exported. There are two reasons for this (1) due to its high grade, it can be sold for more profit offshore; (2) the Marsden Point oil refinery is not configured to process the grade of oil extracted here. Actions needed: Short-term: Convert Marsden Point to process the grade of oil produced here. From now on: Convert from oil-based transport to electric transport, especially electric public transport. Of course, we also have to consider all the products that depend on oil. 5) Most of our population lives by the coast. Current projections of sea level rise are talking about 1-2 metres by the end of this century, and it's possible that sudden ice sheet collapse could cause this to be much greater. We need to be moving infrastructure, and people, away from the coast. 6) Central government needs to empower local government to deal with these issues, rather than (as under the new Minister) restricting them. 7) Medicine - most (all?) pharmaceuticals are imported, although there are many natural medicine alternatives in NZ. How large are our stockpiles? Should we producing and/or stockpiling medicines onshore - for example, insulin, or contraceptives?
    david broatch
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    SWOT Order of importance

    I prefer to put item 5) at 1) if these are listed in  order of importance.

    Sea level is a primary weakness for NZ, being on the ring of fire could be listed  as the primary weakness.

    As per my earlier post...

    I see balancing from  the increased volcanic activity leading to  relative global cooling which slows sea level rise at approx 13 to 18 metres. An educated guess. This tectonic/cooling theory was corroborated about 5 months ago in an article The Guardian ( about 4 years after I wrote to an environmetal editor with the basic premise!)

    My timetable  (from my  studies  from 1986 onwards) moves  2020 for  approx 1 to 2  metre rise to 2026 or even later, thanks, in the main, to the recent activities of US banks. :0)

    I am also guessing that balancing might stabilise at 2035/45. Part of this  derives from observed rates of activity on the Greenland ice field.

    When this melting is  completed it will lead to a rise of only  600mm or so.. which give one an indication of the how huge the mass on Antactica is, which, if it ever all melted will lead to a rise of 80 metres!! (USGS figure I quoted earlier)

    Plants will  grow more slowly, especially around the "active" fields, eg Auckland. Other  fields currently not classified as active may revive.

    Richard
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    SWOT order of imporatnce and strategic responses


    Hi All,

    In my opinion climate change and sea level rise are probably the most significant threat that humanity faces but unfortunately it is not the most immediate.

    I would agree that we certainly “need to be moving infrastructure, and people, away from the coast.” But I don’t think this is something that we should be putting the highest priority on….simply because that task is too immense.

    I think a SWOT analysis is a valuable tool because you can then prioritize and strategize from it. This is where I would agree with Tim’s top three or four, because something could be done about them relatively easily  as they are interlinked. This means the actions associated with fixing them should very likely come from the same system.

     1) The lack of grain production in NZ is a significant issue but that is an issue that we as consumers could possibly have some control over. If it takes 2-3 years to convert a dairy farm then I suggest that we as consumers demonstrate to the producers there is actually a market in this country for NZ grown grain preferably organic. We would need to organize that market but frankly that is what I would like to see come from TT rather than just the usual chatter. 

    2)With the spiraling increases in fertilizer cost, its getting more expensive to produce less. From this situation a niche is opening that will inevitably make organic fertilizers more economically viable. Currently we waste valuable fertilizer. It is killing our rivers. 70% of Waikato waterways are so polluted they are dangerous for stock to drink. 40% of Auckland’s landfill is STILL compostable.  No solids from sewage treatment go back to growing food. In fact I have heard from a reliable source that the phosphorus associated with treated sewage solids that are dumped into Auckland’s landfill are of a higher proportion of phosphorus per weight than the fertilizer that is being imported into this country!

     So there is a link there between farming and fertilizer that we as consumers could potentially manipulate if we demonstrated there was a strong enough market of concerned consumers willing to flex their muscle…..Remember the invisible hand of the market. That’s us. Such action will not change NZ overnight but it might be enough to entice some struggling industrial chemical based farmer out there to ditch the global market and embrace the local organic. There by building resilience.

     3) I would put oil vulnerability here. Liquid energy is one of the biggest issues for regional NZ. I’m all for electrifying transport both trains and cars in the city but oil is the life blood of rural communities and electric vehicles are not going to cut the mustard in the country. But here again this vulnerability can be turned to a strength for local rural communities and that strength could be biofuel  production

    With sustainable biofuel production, you capture energy and organic fertilizer. In my opinion therefore biofuel is actually a way to make organic fertilizers more economically viable as they could be produced in local centralise distribution points. My “back of the envelope” calculations suggested that Labours  now scrapped 2-3% blend of mandatory biofuel would have made approx $42million dollars per annum available for NZ farmers and would have acted as the catalyst for a NZ biofuel industry.

    In NZ “food to fuel” is a non issue because  we have approxiamately 13.5 million hectares in this country producing nothing other than meat, milk, methane and water pollution. There is a huge amount of starch or sugar based crops that we could be growing amongst our grazing that would help “mop up” excess nutrients and provide for significant amounts of biofuel.  For example fodder beet can produce 3500litres per acre, comfrey can produce nearly 2000 litres per acre, Jerusalem artichoke can produce over 2000 litres per acre and if our common wetland reed Raupo is anything like its American cousin typha latifolia there is the potential to produce nearly 7000 litres per acre whilst at the same time absorbing that excess and polluting farm run-off.

    To further that with a strong starch based agricultural sector, many of the plastics and so on that are currently manufactured from petroleum could be manufactured from plant product.

    4)Structual vulnerability or in essence economic sovereignty. If we developed our local communities around community supported agriculture that gave local farmers a local market and incorporated biofuel production into that CSA model, we would essentially be generating local economies based on the tangible commodity of energy, whilst also providing the organic fertilizer for the local farms to produce food and fuel by closing the nutrient loops.

    This approach may not cause massive and immediate structural change to the way that NZ functions but it may just initiate enough change at the local level to ensure resilient local communities when the times get tough.

    On the final note of climate change well made organic fertilizer i.e compost is in humus, soil humus contains about 60% carbon.

    According to  Dr Christine Jones the head of the Australian Soil Carbon Accreditation Scheme …It would only require a 1% increase in soil carbon on 15 million hectares of land to sequester 8 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide in the soil, which is equivalent to the greenhouse emissions for the entire planet.” …..New Zealand alone  grazes 13.5 millon hectares.

    Aa small step I have tried to set up a Ning group to initiate a Grain CSA which i hope would lead onto the other aspects of this strategy. You've got to start somewhere so go here if you are interested in getting on board.

    cheers

    Richard

     

    .

    senjmito
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    SWOT order of importance

    It's good to hear about the Grain CSA you've initiated, Richard.

    Just FYI, the list of items in the "Key Weaknesses" thread is in the order we came up with them in the workshop - it is not prioritised.

    One of the ways of looking at these is on a risk management basis: something that is assessed as having a comparatively low probability, but a high impact, may deserve greater consideration than would be warranted on its probability alone. It's possible that the sea level will rise by no more than a metre during the 21st century, which would be enough in itself to warrant serious consideration; but it's also possible that the catastrophic collapse of an ice sheet (Greenland or West Antarctica being the most likely candidate) will lead to much greater and more abrupt sea level rises. It would be prudent to consider both possibilities - gradual rise and abrupt rise - because the latter, though less likely, has a greater effect.

    As an aside, recent research suggests that sea level rise would not be uniform worldwide if an ice sheet collapsed: abrupt rises in sea level in one part of the world in the past appear to have taken years and sometimes decades to take full effect in the other hemisphere. If anyone's interested, let me know, and I'll dig out the reference.

    Peter Goldsbury
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    SWOT - great ideas but communities need to "roll their own"

    Great to have some starting templates but evey community need own what they arte doing.

     

    Some of you interested in this area may be like to join the Living Systems Thinking Workshop we are running in Devonport next week.  Tues - Wed details www.projectmanagement.co.nz  We may be able to offer some standby places for non-waged attendees.

     

    Regards

    Peter

    Richard
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    There is absolutely no doubt

    There is absolutely no doubt every community needs to own what they are doing and be predominantly autonomous in what they do.

    But no system operates in isolation and nor does any singular community. And as I'm sure you are well aware, from the systems persepective, everything is integrated especially when the parts of the system are located closer together.

    The same can be said for our human ecology. The closer our communities are to each other the more integrated they are. Often there are many different communities that make up a catchment and many different catchments that make up a bioregion. The integration exists  at many levels. Without  acknowledging and understanding that systems integration, actions in isolation can ineffect be detrimental to those wider spheres.

    Therefore, I strongly believe there needs to be some level of consensus and cohesion to the responses that each TT community takes that commonly link those responses to an integrated approach and builds resilience in the wider spheres.

    To further that such an integrated approaches should not be seen as an attempt at developing a place of authority, it must  must actually develop and evolve from within.

    So from my perspective initiating a SWOT analysis is not to set some authoritarian agenda. I see it as a necessary tool for TT to develop itself commonly so that we all know where we are coming from. Whether that tool is picked up and used remains to be seen but  as my old Social Ecology lecturer used to say "Without integration systems fall into chaos."

    Cheers

    Richard

    david broatch
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    I agree senjmito,.. as per my earlier post...

    which was...

    I prefer to put item 5) at 1) if these are listed in  order of importance.

    Sea level is a primary weakness for NZ, being on the ring of fire could be listed  as the primary weakness.

    As per my earlier post...

    I see balancing from  the increased volcanic activity leading to  relative global cooling which slows sea level rise at approx 13 to 18 metres. An educated guess. This tectonic/cooling theory was corroborated about 5 months ago in an article The Guardian ( about 4 years after I wrote to an environmetal editor with the basic premise!)

    My timetable  (from my  studies  from 1986 onwards) moves  2020 for  approx 1 to 2  metre rise to 2026 or even later, thanks, in the main, to the recent activities of US banks. :0)

    I am also guessing that balancing might stabilise at 2035/45. Part of this  derives from observed rates of activity on the Greenland ice field.

    When this (Greenland) melting is  completed it will lead to a rise of only  600mm or so.. which give one an indication of the how huge the mass on Antactica is, which, if it ever all melted, will lead to a rise of 80 metres!! (USGS figure I quoted earlier)

    Plants will  grow more slowly, especially around the "active" fields, eg Auckland. Other  fields currently not classified as active may revive.

    » I shall NOT say these enly wence.... Earlier I saw in this thread .. a negative approach to dealing now with the likely future drownings ...because the task was too big to prioritise.... But this  denial is not helpful..  Measures which  attempt to counter anticipated rises are already incorporated into  local authority planning and insurance policies.. tending to be negative...  Other measures could be implemented to encourage  settlement on higher ground.. positive  encouragement.. lower premiums and  rates rebates etc. "Environmental refugees" from a variety of sources are already  relocating to NZ in increasing numbers. Having  researched the scenarios probable  between 2010  to 2030, (seen as a critical period)  for over 30 years and very early on studying the  rate of absorption of (and possible outcomes from) useful knowledge..( cf Limits to Useful Knowledge)  I  believe that it is never too late to implement preventative measures, even if only for the psychologicsl benefits.....and something  else might happen. This is why I  used,  as a prelim to several papers, this  old bit of Chinoiserie..... "Prescience is  only the flower of the Tao and the beginning of folly." Urgent call have to go..
    hjones
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    Another threat or weakness - degradation of innovation skills

    A comment on the No 8 wire type skills appears in other sections, but perhaps it could be renamed if desired.  One of the NZ personal traits which assisted our pioneer forefathers was the ability to make do with some existing hardware and convert it into something else which suited their purpose.  #8 gauge wire was the glue which held this together on the farm as it was flexible but strong and could be reshaped into the requirement of the day.  Not at all like the high tenstile #10 gauge wire used these days.  Pedal power as elsewhere in this list is a typical example.

    There seems to be a desire in many quarters for Nz'ers to lose this capability and instead use the American or European model of design or purchase a ready made set of equipment in a more refined manner.  While this may work for bigger markets, NZ does not have a market big enough to cope.  It also favours the business market model rather than fix, alter or improve an existing tool or bit of equipment.  It can also be wasteful of resources.  The move to big efficient organisations and engineering workshops tends to drive out the imagination and innovative skills which have favoured our forefathers.  With the possible collapse of these large firms and/or the disruption of the global market, then these ready made goods may not even be available to purchase anyway.

    An appreciation of those who have these skills and fostering of their abilities as well as sharing of the knowledge they create is another option we may need to consider.  Men (and women) in their sheds passing on their knowledge and skills to new generations.

    Some trust and faith in our collective ability to create something out of nothing and use local knowledge and contacts is  worth promoting.  The Hamilton jet, Britten motorcycle and the world's fastest Indian are all great examples of what we do well.  Find others who do this and help each other out.

    senjmito
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    Joined: 23 Jul 2008
    Innovation skills - how to promote them?

    Re innovation skills - what's the best way for the TT movement to find out who has these skills, help/encourage these people to teach their skills to others, and get the word out about how interested people can learn these skills?

    rbateman
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    Joined: 4 Apr 2009
    I think it depends on what

    I think it depends on what skills we are talking about. Mending things, building everyday things doesn't use what are classically called innovation skills. I teach at Unitec in the design department. We work on teaching creativity and innovation skills. I think short courses, community courses etc could easily be set up and run to increase the number of people who can think informatively. This is a big issue for education and it needs to start at primary school. I'm keen to discuss this.

    david broatch
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    Joined: 4 Mar 2009
    Tap washers etc.,

    as per my earlier post..

    "... for over 30 years and very early on studying the  rate of absorption of (and possible outcomes from) useful knowledge..( cf Limits to Useful Knowledge)  I  believe that it is never too late to implement preventative measures, even if only for the psychologicsl benefits.."

    Another branch of useful knowledge..

    I was refering to the "BIG PICTURE" and  being handy is very much part of of it...

    Basic home survival skills..

    Need to join Civil (Self-) Defense. Go to Placemakers, get the free brochures, help Mum and Dad fix things, become part of the Home-Schoolers Curriculum, be a WWOOFER, re-instate  apprenticeships, etc.

    Mind you, these children can probably install your printer, fix the computer  and work your cell phone etc....

    Reminds me, last time I WAS IN L.A., some time towards the end of the  last millenium, STAYING WITH A BIT PART PART TIME ACTOR (as most are).. She was an expat UKer handy-person, while resting.. got paid very well to hang up pictures and such like... Urban USers have it much worse than us.

     

    rbateman
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    Joined: 4 Apr 2009
    No 8

    I made a comment on the No 8 wire skills in the other section. I said it needed to be renamed to face up to the contemporary and future issues we face in NZ rather than to refer to the past that NZ has emerged from. Of late, design, innovation and business magazine Idealog magazine has debated this issue to death

    I totally agree that the ability to make, remake, mend, invent etc could become vital to NZs future as well to the future of all countries (I'm involved with this type of activity now). It is true to say that No 8 is not a NZ only trait - most countries have their own version of the No 8 and we can all learn alot from each other. Collating and sharing such information will no doubt become a very important job in the years to come. And many European countries are well ahead of NZ where this is concerned.

    Ask a teenager to change a tap washer, service a simple engine, build a fence and the likely hood is they wouldn't have a clue - those everyday skills are disappearing especially where the tasks have become more complicated (car engines as an example) The biggest task we face here (and everywhere) is getting generation C,X etc to come to grips with the problems and then the solutions. Role models from yesteryear are all well and good but we need more than that if No 8, nay 9 or 10 is going to be willingly engaged with and taken to the required level.

     

     

    david broatch
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    Joined: 4 Mar 2009
    likelihood

    The  likely hood might be a possible crime suspect caught on CCTV. ;0)

    Hoodies, along with burkas, are banned in some malls in US/UK... everywhere in Holland..

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article577915.ece

    PS....

    I posted a tap-washer comment too.

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